Examples: how to pronounce T: American English Pronunciation

Examples: how to pronounce T: American English Pronunciation


This is a follow up video to different pronunciations
for the T. If you haven’t watched that video, you should, because everything that was learned
there is going to be reviewed via testing in this video. First what we’re going to do
is look at a list of words and decide how the T is pronounced in the word. First, this word. How do you pronounce that
T? It is at the beginning of the word, therefore it is pronounced with the real T sound, T,
time. This word. How to pronounce this T? This T comes between two vowel sounds. Therefore
it is pronounced as the flap/tap T, or, in other words, the D sound. Water, water. How
do you pronounce the T in this word? It comes at the end of a syllable in the consonant
cluster FT. Therefore, as it is part of this cluster, it is pronounced as a real T sound.
Softer, tt, tt, softer. How do you pronounce the T in this word? In
this word it is followed by a schwa and the N sound. Therefore it is pronounced as
a stop. Fountain, fountain. How do you pronounce the T in this word? It ends the word. It is
not part of a consonant cluster. Therefore, it is a stop. Carpet, carpet. How do you pronounce
this word? It is part of a consonant cluster, therefore, it is pronounced as a real T. St,
st, string, string. How do you pronounce the T’s here? They come between two vowel sounds.
Therefore, it is the flap/tap T or the D sound. How do you pronounce the T here? It is beginning
a stressed syllable. Therefore, it is pronounced as the real T. Tt, tt, until, until. Let’s compare these two words. In one of the
words, the double T is pronounced as the tt, real T sound. In the other word it is the
flap or tap T, in other words, the D sound. Which is which? The first word: the stress
falls on the second syllable, which is begun with the T sound. Therefore, it is a true
T. A real, tt, T sound. Attack, attack. In the second word, it begins an unstressed syllable,
and it falls between two vowel sounds. Attitude. Attitude. Therefore it is the flap/tap T or,
dd, the D sound. Let’s look at some sentences now. How do you
pronounce the first T? The T at the end of the word ‘what’. Well, the T is at the end
of the word, it is not part of a consonant cluster, and it does not link to a next word
that begins with a vowel or diphthong. Therefore, it must be a stop. The second word, how do
you pronounce that T? It begins the word. Therefore, it is the, tt, actual T sound.
What time, what time. And the next T, also it’s beginning a word. Therefore, it is the
actual T sound. What time tomorrow? And the answer, how do you pronounce that T? Again
it is ending a word, and the word that comes after does not begin with a vowel or diphthong
sound. Therefore, it’s a stop. At, at, at, at seven. At seven. What time tomorrow? At
seven. This sentence. How do you pronounce that T?
It’s at the end of a word, but it does link to the next word, which begins with a vowel
sound. Therefore, the sound comes between two vowel sounds. It is then going to be pronounced
as the flap/tap T, or, in other words, the D sound. I’m outta, I’m outta. Now, in this
particular phrase, the word ‘of’ is generally reduced to simply being the schwa sound. No
consonant. I’m out of here. I’m out of here. How do you pronounce the T in this sentence?
Not the TH. It begins a word, so it would be the tt, real T sound. But as I said in
the different T pronunciations video, it is a reduced word, and it might be reduced to
the point of actually having a voiced sound there. Dd, dd, rather than tt, tt. I’m going
to the bank, I’m going to the bank, I’m going – to – the bank. How do you pronounce the Ts in this sentence?
In the first word, it begins the word, so it is the tt, actual T sound. Tell. The next
T is part of the TR consonant cluster, and also, it’s beginning a word. Again, it’s the
tt, real T sound. Tell me the truth. How do you pronounce the Ts in this sentence?
In the first word. It is part of a consonant cluster at the beginning of a syllable. It
is pronounced as a real T. Tt, chemistry. Chemistry. How do you pronounce the next T?
It’s at the end of a word, not part of a consonant cluster, but it does connect to the next word,
which begins with a vowel sound. Therefore it would be dd, dd, the flap T sound, or,
the D sound. At eight, at eight. I just gave away the next word. How do you pronounce that
T? Well, the next word, Anatomy, does begin with a vowel. But there’s a comma there, which
means we’re not going to connect it. Therefore it is a T at the end of a word, not part of
a consonant cluster, it’s a stop. At eight, at eight. Chemistry’s at eight. how do you
pronounce the T in the next word? Again it is a T between two vowel sounds. Anatomy,
anatomy. Therefore it is the flap T sound, or, D. Anatomy. And again, the T in the next
word is pronounced as a stop. It comes at the end of the word. At, at. And finally,
it begins the word. Therefore it is pronounced as the real T. Tt, ten. How do you pronounce the T’s in this sentence.
The first T. It’s followed by the schwa and N sounds. Therefore, it is a stop. An acquaintance,
an acquaintance. And the next T? It begins a word. Therefore it is, tt, the actual T
sound. An acquaintance told me. How do you pronounce the Ts in this sentence? The first
T finishes the word, but it is part of a consonant cluster, therefore it is pronounced as the
actual T. I slept, tt, tt, I slept. The next T? Again, it is part of a consonant cluster
at the end of a word. It is pronounced, tt, as an actual T. I slept well last… And finally,
the T here is the end of the word. Not part of a consonant cluster. It is a stop. I slept
well last night. How do you pronounce the T in this sentence?
It’s an ending T, it’s part of a consonant cluster, but remember NT was the exception
consonant cluster. So the T here is a stop. I was sent, I was sent, I was sent home. I
was sent home. I hope this has helped to clarify this pretty
complicated situation: how to pronounce a T, depending on where it falls in a word or
in a sentence. That’s it, and thanks so much for using Rachel’s English.

100 thoughts on “Examples: how to pronounce T: American English Pronunciation”

  1. Thanks for the videos, Rachel. For those whose native languages have a trilled "R" sound, I've noticed when learning the American "R" in words like "water" and "later" that it is exactly like the trilled "R" sound (but don't trill it more than once). I hope this helps.

  2. I have confusion here: why you said ' I slept well last night', I can hear the t in slept,but I can't hear the t in the last, t-w is different than t-n?

  3. Hello Rachel. I'm a big fan of your youtube channel – it helps me a lot. About this T sound…I was wondering…the word "sentence" has a stop sound, doesn't it? At least it's how I hear it whenever you say it. If so, is it because rule 3.b (schwa + n sound)? – Regards from Brazil

  4. I started with watching "how to pronounce Can vs. Can't" and I can't stop moving to different videos with each "If you haven't watched…"

  5. hi Rachel,your teaching is awesome. You explain very effectively but I request you to give more examples or else please make a particular video with 100 or 200 words so that we can listen and imitate.

  6. Why is "attitude" 's "tude" starts with a [t] instead of [d]? It is in between vowels, and it's not a stressed syllable.

  7. Hello Mrs Rachel, In american english most of T sounds disappear when they come after the consonant "N" like "internet" or "interview", but in the word "Sentence" Could I say : / 'senens / ? please don't get me wrong.
    Thank you Teacher R.

  8. Hi Rachel,
    How about the "attitude"? Why the "t" in "tude" is pronounced as real "t"? it isnt stressed on the "tude" syllable, and it is between two vowels, why is it a true "t" sound?
    Thanks so much.

  9. I have question: how to /ti/ sound as " tickets!!!'' I have trouble saying it forever, sometime I can say it right but only few times. My brother says me I am saying it as /k/ sound, But I cant tell the differents. Thank you.

  10. hi Rachel, I want to know if the T sound is often dropped in the end of the word as the T in the phrase "she taught me". The T can be dropped in this phrase??

  11. Wow, such an easy to understand explanation, and all those examples help a lot.
    Take all my likes, you deserve it.

  12. I'm going to = I'm going do? Hardly, because the "t" is not between the vowels. But I go to = I go do, because the "t" is between the vowels. The same for "matter" = "mader", because the "t" is between the vowels. but "ng" is not a vowel. It's a consonant.
    "

  13. Hi Rachel, I've got a question here. Last week I asked my American friend about the glottal stop T sound as in words "fountain", "written", etc. But he told me that he didn't know this pronunciation rule, and it might be regional, not a universal rule to apply. Also, I observed some of my American friends pronuncing words containing stop T, but they all pronunce the real T sound. As a non native speaker, it sometimes gets so confusing and frustrating to learn the pronunciation rules cus we dunno if they are universal or just regional.

  14. I have a question about phrases like “got you” , “what you” / “need you” , “did you”, which pronunciation is commonly used – with a stop consonant or with a ch / ʤ sound?

  15. Hi Rachel, I have a question about the "T" sound. Could you please tell me how to pronounce words like "platinum", "maintenance" and "botanist"? I often hear people just say "plat-num" and "main-nance"? why is that?
    thanks for your help. I learned so much watching your vids 🙂

  16. Hmmm. Rachel, I didn't hear you pronounce (release) the /t/ at word final in "last" when you said "last night". Is my ear not perceiving it?

  17. I never heard of that T stop, it is very hard x) i tried
    Fountain / Acquaintance
    I pronounce the real T sound but can't figure how to pronounce them with that T stop rule

  18. Yeahhh Teacher Rachel … this is one of the most helpful video that I ever seen here in your channel … 🙂

    I'm one of your students in Rachel's Academy. 🙂

    All the best, my Teacher 🙂

  19. First of all I'd like to say who you are very pretty, second I wanna thanks by your movies and to end I need to say that you're making a nice job!

  20. So, for the native spanish speakers this doble "TT" sound is like the single "r" sound, right?

  21. You say a lot the word "sentence" throughout the video and it's a clear example of the way the stop-t should be pronounced, I practiced several times when you said that word

  22. If anyone is need of a native English speaker to skype with, I would be more than happy to oblige. One of the hardest parts of learning a language is finding situations in which you can use it regularly, and pick up a natural conversational vibe to help with true fluency. Message me if you would like. 🙂 Good luck

  23. Hi Rachel, I understand the first two "t"s in the word "attitude" should be pronounced as stop t, but isn't the third t supposed to be pronounced as a stop t,too? Cuz it's also between two vowels

  24. Another awesome job from Rachel's English, most certainly one of the best channels for English learners to improve their English. Seriously, Rachel, you rock! Keep up the good work! I beg you!

  25. why you prounounce true t in first word in phrase: last night it was between two constant!! should dropped it or what?

  26. 8:50 But in another video you had said that "t" should be pronounced as a stop sound before voiced consonants. So that shouldn't these "t"s in this sentence should be pronounced as stop sounds? You contradicted yourself. I am really confused now.

  27. You are great…Please promote my you tube channel on hindi speech therapy…And indian sign language… Thanks

  28. Hi Rachel, i just recently found your videos and they are very helpful. Thank you for sharing! I've been using Ann Cook's book as a guide for several years and your video gives me a different look at the accent. It's awesome! But sometimes I still struggle with the "t" sound, like in "bottle". Many Americans would just pronounce it as the flap t, i do that too. but I can't convince myself with the theory that t is d when it's unstressed and between two vowel or diphthong sounds. for the word "bottle" or "little", it's not the case, right?, why do we still use flap t,then? could you please explain? Thanks ahead!

  29. 9:16 it seems to me the T in “slept” and “last” would be elided because they are caught in the middle of two consonants.

  30. This vdo is a complete T pronouncation specialisation in my opinion. This is really one of greatest vdos. Thank you very much.

  31. Hi I have a question, how can you guys differentiate between ‘wedding’ and ‘wetting ‘ if they are all ‘d’? Thank you.

  32. In the phrases slept well and last night shouldn't we drop the Ts. ? I heard that when a "T" is in the middle of a three-way consonant cluster, it must be dropped, or is it just a British thing? I say this because I watched a video IN BBC ENGLISH SAYING THIS ?? IM CONFUSED??

  33. what about attitude? There are two t's in the word, but we don't flap the second t even though it's between i and u. What is the rule? Thanks!

  34. The second t in the word attiTude is pronounced like flap t in this video but this t begins the syllable. Why so?

  35. In the sentence "I slept well last night", you pronounced "last" with a stopped t. Maybe, there is a stronger rule: a t follow by an n is pronounced as a stopped t. Thanks Rachel for your awesome videos!

  36. I am learning English and I teach also Spanish. English is not easy some times, but every language has others difficulties too. I learn a lot with Rachel, I think this is the best pronunciation teacher.

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