NEI-LabTV Profile: Mariana Rius, Ophthalmic Genetics & Visual Function Branch

NEI-LabTV Profile: Mariana Rius, Ophthalmic Genetics & Visual Function Branch


the ok My name is Mariana Rius and we are in the Ophthalmic Genetics & Visual Function Branch of the National Eye Institute. My Lab specializes in studying UVL Coloboma which is a developmental disease occurring during
eye development and we believe that there are genetic
components that we want to better understand. UVLColoboma accounts for 10 percent of childhood blindness and so our lab tries to identify the players in UVLColoboma to try to help families that are affected by the disease. I
grew up in Rockville, Maryland. Both my parents
are in the sciences. My mother does cancer research actually and my
father is a psychiatrist. I do find a lot of interest in finding out how things work and the underlying mechanisms that govern our surroundings and our environment and that was what drove me into actually doing research to answer health and scientific questions. The Zebra Fish is a great tool for developmental research because the eggs develop in a clear membrane so you can watch the entire developmental
process without having to use a human or a live uterus. So with the Zebrafish, I was able to see the effects of moving the gene expression on-demand process of the eye. Now we’re solidifying what we believe is happening at the molecular level. I had to to some cell culture we did some Western blotting and
immunofluorescence to see actually where do we see them and who they involved with then after that we had some mechanistic
questions so solving puzzles and figuring out with the
next step. I was at the bench doing cloning, DNA extraction, setting PCR reactions making probes, and then was able to transfer those tools to the Zebrafish. Every day you walk in to work you have something completely different to do. This finding
is actually being translated before this project we had no idea of this use involvement in the eye so this is pretty new novel finding that we actually have the ability to apply to more health scientific perspective. It’s
pretty cool. And so it is extremely collaborative
and science would be impossible to do alone so you need
great colleagues The research that I’ve done here has opened up the doors to looking at the
genes that now we know are involved in
disease. I would say that the sole driving force is your passion, and if you have fun follow it and allow it to grow and people will feed off that enthusiasm and
motivation and drive and allow you to work on projects and get involved in what they’re doing
and if you’re able to share enthusiasm that
people have for their on work and allow that to you grow also its beautiful thing the moral the way the mind where the mind the way the ok book

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