The Centre For Urban Ecology – Building Features – Passive Heating and Cooling – Part 1 of 3

The Centre For Urban Ecology – Building Features – Passive Heating and Cooling – Part 1 of 3


Hey guys! It’s Grizzly! I’m just foraging for some berries
in the lovely forest there. This is the first part of a three part video
on the passive heating and cooling
for the centre for urban ecology now theres a lot,
so thats why theres three parts,
so stay with us The centre uses seven methods of
passive heating and cooling. in this video we’ll be talking about
the solar awning and thermal mass floors Passive heating and cooling techniques
either manipulate or harness energy from the sun,
also known as solar energy First we’re going to talk about the solar awning, now it’s a gorgous day outside,
the sun is shining, so if you come on in,
you can actually see the solar awning in action. Now if you look up, you can see that even though there are gaps
between the wooden slats the sun is actually being blocked If you take a look down, you can see that the sunlight only reaches
into about halfway into the width of the room. Now why would we have a solar awning?
The solar awning almost works like a hat for the building. Why would you wear a hat? To block the sun right? Exactly! So! we put the solar awning on the south side of the building
because thats where the sun prodominately comes from as well as it is actually wide the width and the height are set at precise angles so that it works with the movement of the sun throughout the year During the summertime
the sunlight is actually at the heighest point of the sky. so that way the level of the sunlight
when it comes into the first floor of the building only reaches about these four posts here. In the winter, the opposite happens because the sun is lower in the sky it is able to enter under the awning, and thus into the building causing the air temperature to rise this brings us to another feature
that benefits from the winter sun
being allowed to enter the building: the thermal mass floors One of the ways that floors heat the building
is that theyre made of concrete slabs the reason for using concrete,
is that it’s a very dense material, and the denser a material is,
the more heat or energy it can absorb and then in turn reheat into the atmosphere around it just like how the sidewalk gets extremely hot
when you’re walking and you feel the heat radiating off the sidewalk
on a hot summer day In addition to the sun,
the floors are also heated from the inside they have many tubes that contain
a mix of antifreeze and water and that liquid is then heated
and then pumped through in a cycle through the floors which then absorb the heat energy
and radiate it into the building. Thats it, brings us to the end of the first part
of the passive heating and cooling videos Stay tuned for the other two, i’m hungry, i’m gone Oh, oh, oh, and don’t forget The Humber Arboretum
Where learning is natural

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