The Fer-de-Lance

The Fer-de-Lance


Oh, jeez. Oh, wow. Wow! Is this how you typically catch venomous
snakes in the wild? – You put them in a tube?
– Mm hmm. It is very safe. – Unless you let go of the tail and
then it [whooshing noise] And it seems a little agitated. – Can I touch it?
– It is a very nervous snake. The local people thought it’s a
rattlesnake. They think it’s a rattlesnake because of the tail?
– Mm hmm. So, we’re here with Pablo again, and he has found a fer-de-lance snake. – What can you tell us about the snake?
– It’s a venomous snake, very common in the Amazon basin. – It’s very aggressive, this snake.
– Yeah. – Whoaaoaaaaooaahhhh! – [laughter]
– Ow, woah, oh God! He’s not happy! Oh, jeez! Oh my gosh, I think it left a fang in
the handle of your thing. – Oh, God.
– One fang. – Don’t touch that! It’s got venom on it!
– No, I don’t have injuries in my finger. – [laughter]
– Oh gosh. Wow. Wow! – The snake is attracted to communities,
due to… because of the rats. – Yeah, right! Exactly. So really they’re
coming in and they’re responsible for pest control. – Where did you find it?
– I found it last night, in the entry of one of the trails.
– Oh! That’s reassuring! – Across the trail.
– Was it like, in the middle of the trail? – Yeah, in the middle of the trail.
– Oh great, ’cause I’ve been walking around in my sandals at night.
– …waiting for somebody without boots. – [laughter]
– Oh God! Aaaaahh.

100 thoughts on “The Fer-de-Lance”

  1. You walk around there in your sandals!? Is that normal? I kinda expect that everything over there is capable of killing me, so I would probably sleep in my boots… for a while at least ^^

  2. Well, well, well. As no one mentioned the signification of Fer-de-lance, let me please play the cheap smart-alec know-it-all of these complementaries. Fer-de-Lance is a French name meaning "spearhead". You're welcome.

  3. AHHHH SNAKES!!! bring in the honey badgers,
    …days later well i think we might of ruin the ecosystem, but at least there are no snakes 

  4. I get nervous walking without boots in the Ozark mountains at night because of the cottonmouths and copperheads. I think I'd be wearing chainmail on my feet if I was walking somewhere with Fer-de-lances lurking. That said, what a beautiful snake!

  5. Do snakes often lose their fangs? Do they grow back?  I like the brain scoop, it makes me ask questions I have never thought of before.

  6. Thanks Emily for sharing your adventures with everybody! I wish you would post one episode every day. I would totally devote 10 minutes of every day for my entire life just to watch The Brain Scoop!

  7. I'm enjoying these videos but I'm starting to miss Emily talking to us back in the lab. Also, the music in this one was a little much for my taste. Still, keep 'em coming! Happy holidays, Brain Scoopers!

  8. I have loved the brain scoop from the start, but honestly, these recent videos are so disappointing. The trip to the amazon and to the bat caves had so much potential to be awesome brain scoop episodes, but the way they are filmed and edited just make it so… boring. I miss Emily's enthusiastic explanations and the cheerful music! Now we get a brief and not all that educational explanation of the animals, a couple facts pop up on screen, some classical music, and boom. Episode over. The channel has lost it's charm and it makes me really sad.
    Sorry, at this point I am just rambling.

  9. Emily, you're level of courage exceeds mine. I would not be so close to a snake on purpose. I am a florist and I have had many tree frogs jump in my face from sealed boxes of flowers from Columbia , but no snakes , whew. Keep up the good ,crazy work,

  10. I am really enjoying these Amazon episodes, the cinematography and music are beautiful and transporting. As usual your curiosity and enthusiasm for the world around you is infectious and inspiring! Keep up the good work!  

  11. I might sound creepy but it has been a long time since you skinned something… I mean, prepared a museum exhibit! I liked those videos because it's almost like forensic science! Guessing how the animal died and how their body works is more fun with brainscoop than with a book. 🙂

  12. "We found so many snakes… we decided to have a few episodes devoted to these beautiful and misunderstood creatures." "beautiful"
    "*the fer-de-lance's venom can kill a human"

    No I think we understand them just fine. Don't walk around in open shoes in the Amazon and RUN LIKE HELL.

  13. I get why sandals are a bad idea, but what would be the alternative? I don't understand how boots would help. Can't a snake bite through boots?

  14. So interesting finally seeing a Fer-de-Lance after only previously knowing it from a murder mystery by that same name. And yes, the snake was the murder weapon.

  15. I think the Fer-de-lance is known as Jergón in Perú…can't remember if I'm correct. Awesome video, I'd be so terrified of touching even its fang!

  16. It's seriously awesome that you get to go look at animals all over the world Emily, but I really miss watching you dissect local fauna.

  17. On of the reasons I like this show is that you find out really cool new stuff, I mean, "snake tube" fascinating. puts pipe on mouth

  18. Just to elaborate on why the locals call it a 'rattlesnake'. The Fer de lance doesn't have its own rattle but when threatened it flickers it's tail rapidly on the leaves of the forest floor which creates a rattling, hissing sound. Emily is pointing out the tail flicking behaviour.

  19. O.o How could you walk around the forest in sandals..  I always wear leather boots, and would probably get some taller boots or leather greaves if I was hiking anywhere there were highly venomous snakes..

  20. 2:05 "Poisons vs. Venoms" Respectfully that's wrong. Poisons are chemical elements or compounds that disrupt biological processes. Toxins are poisons that are produced by biological processes. Venoms are toxins that are delivered through the skin (like through a bite or a sting).

    All toxins are poisons, and all venoms are toxins, so all venoms are poisons.

  21. Hi My name is Mark Kelly. I'm a reporter at KPIX TV (CBS) in San Francisco. Would you mind if I used a very short (10 second) clip of this snake for my news story tonight?? 415-505-0316.

  22. This venom/poison argument is so useless. Venom is just a more exact term for poison. Thats all it is. "Poison" can also be injected, and there are animals with "toxic" mouths that can cause many of the same symptoms as what we would other wise call "venom" when they bite another animal. You could also absorb venom through an open wound if you are handling fresh venom. Therefore, shut the fuck up if someone says a snake is poisonous. It's basically true and doesn't change anything.

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  24. In India, where most snakebite fatalities occur, most happen at night and to the ankles/feet. Snakes aside, thorns, ants, centipedes and other nasties alone would have me wearing galoshes

  25. Love the attitude of snakes, so agressive. My cat once brought me a 'present' of a baby dugite. Even the little ones have enough venom to kill an adult human, but this ones fangs wernt long enough to go thru the cats fur. Had broken its back, so couldn't move. The saying 'mad as a cut snake' (common in Aus, dunno bout the rest of the world) definitely holds water. This guy was done for, but was totally going to savage anything his little head got ahold of.

    Puss was super proud. Fortunately, shes no dummy, n after a very stern talking to, hasnt caught another snake or legless lizard since. Although brings in rats n mice fairly regular, she gets much praise for that (less so if its on my pillow. Its sweet, but gross).

    I have a collection of preserved rat and mouse skins, donated by my cat. I cant call myself a taxidermist, but gotten pretty handy at skinning mice. Cats not gonna eat em, n it'd be a shame to waste. A healthy rat has the most amazingly lusterous pelt. Id love to try a squirrel or beaver or skunk, but dont have them here, n its totally illegall to target possum. Our possum are a million times cuter than the American possum. Ringtail or brushtail possums, they're gorgeous. My dad had a ringtail as a pet when he was a kid. Hunting not being a big thing here, not much taxidermy, but i think i could get into it in a big way.

  26. I loved your short segment on the Far De Lance. Was bitten by one about 30 years ago whole on a medical mission trip to Central and South America. all I remember of what happened was seeing the snake and the pain of the actual bite. I was wearing boots, but at least one of the fangs hit above the boot. Anyway , I was in a sort of coma for about 10 days. I was given my last rights a Catholic. I survived the bite, but I made a pact with God that I would continue to continue my medical missions at least once a year.. I was unable to do a mission due to Hurricane Michael. I pledge that I will continue with our yearly mission until I can physically or mentally continue.

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