The Gene and Dave Show – SXSW 2018

The Gene and Dave Show – SXSW 2018


[music] – The following program may contain strong language and brief nudity. But don’t get your hopes up. After all, this is public access TV. (rooster crows) This program was made possible from the support of VSA
of Texas and Amerigroup. (rock music) ♪ Until you’re standing tall ♪ ♪ You’re gonna need a solution ♪ – Rise up, Amerigroup. – All set, Dave? – I’m ready, Gene. – I’m Gene. – And I’m Dave. – And we’re the – Gene and Dave Show. (audience claps and cheers) – Well, Dave, another
Southwest has come and gone. – It has, South by
Southwest 2018 this time. And another good time, exciting time. Lots of people in Austin, Texas. – There really were. You go to the convention center, and you feel the energy– – Oh yeah, the energy is
all the way, downtown, everywhere you go, everybody’s excited. And it’s really cool to meet new people from all over the world
come to South by Southwest. – Yeah, yeah, you hear
the different dialects and different languages, and it’s, well, it’s just a really cool feeling. You come to the convention center, you see it surrounded by food trucks, and I found one truck I liked. – And that’s your favorite
part, is the food trucks. – The food trucks. There’s a gentleman, the owner of Burger, which is a food truck,
a guy named Vince, and he had me try their brisket burger. – Oh, okay. – Oh my gosh. (laughs) – Was it good? – It was great.
(Dave laughs) It was super, you’re gonna wanna search out Vince’s truck whenever you’re in downtown area. See, here’s a picture of me outside, by the marquee for the South by Southwest. It was a beautiful day, but years past it’s been a bit warmer. – Yeah. And last year it was rainy. – Rainy, yeah. Then you get inside, you see the crowds. – Here’s a video of me
navigating through the crowds (Gene chuckles)
going a hundred miles an hour, so that’s always fun and exciting. See how many people I
can try not to run over. – Did you avoid ’em all? – Most of ’em, yeah, most of ’em. – Okay, great. – The other ones will be sending us an email shortly, I’m sure. – Yeah. And going through registration, this time I told I’m here
as a member of the press, they said, “Well, you go
over here, get your badge.” Got my badge, I had to go
somewhere else to get my bag, and somewhere else, you
have the camera tag. But everyone was friendly enough there that we got through pretty
quickly, so that was nice. – Yeah, some really great volunteers at South by Southwest this year, too. And I recommend to anybody
that lives here in Austin, volunteer to be a helper
at South by Southwest. There’s a lotta different jobs. It takes a lotta people to
kick this whole thing off. And by volunteering,
they give you passes, so volunteer. – It’s well worth the exchange, your time for what you can see there. Our videographer backed out shortly before the conference started, but you and I were ready. – We were. Sometimes it’s hard to tape our own show and be on both sides of the cameras, next to impossible, but
we found a way to do it. – Yeah, here’s a shot of me and you with our cameras gettin’ ready
to take care of business. (Dave chuckles) We started going through
the convention center. First place I found ‘s
a place called Boni. It’s a service that they provide for people who’re visually impaired. They log on to their website,
to Boni’s website, and someone there helps ’em, I should say, they’re able to navigate
through the hallways by voice, by being connected to this website. So let’s say– – So they log in to Boni,
and Boni can show ’em where to go and tell ’em how
to navigate through stuff via a camera, or? – Yeah, well they’ve got– – A sixth sense. – They’ve got beacons
set up in the building, so the beacons might, one
might be in a cafeteria, one might be at the restrooms, and your GPS locator on your phone helps them determine
exactly where you are– – Ah, okay.
– In the building. Yeah, they could guide you– – And it’s that accurate, that they can do it within the building, huh? – It is, except if you’re
looking for a bathroom. (both laugh) You gotta be careful you’re
using the right bathroom, ’cause the men and the woman’s
is right next to each other. – Right. – So you gotta be careful of that. – I guess that’s why they have the braille on the signs, right? – Yeah. – The website for that is loudsteps.com and boniglobal.com. I spoke with Paul, who’s the North
American representative there, and he was telling me how it works. But it’s definitely worth
checking out those websites. If you’re having an event and you wanna make that service available to folks, if someone subscribes to that service, as soon as they come to the building, they get a notice that that service– – Oh, wow. – Is available to them. – That’d be a great service to offer. – And then I introduced Ron Lucy (cash register dings)
to them, and Hiram who’s with Knowbility, so they
were both interested in that. – Actually Hiram is with
Microassist and Knowbility. – Oh, Microassist and — – Microassist, yeah. He’s on the Knowbility
board, but another great guy that knows a lot about accessibility. – So they had a good chat, so I hope maybe we get that service in the Capitol. Then going along– – ‘Cause you never know when you need a Boni to help lead you the way. – (laughs) Exactly. – Right. – Exactly. We ran into Sharron with Knowbility. We always look for the Knowbility table. – That’s right. – And they always have some
sorta demonstration going on. This year we found Dave
Chappelle over there. Dave has cerebral palsy, he has no speech, so he
communicates through his computer, and he’s able to communicate pretty well. And he’s a fellow
Clevelander, I might add. – Oh, okay. – He left the Frozen North
to come down here to Austin. But it’s good to see
Sharron and the folks there. I interviewed Sharron, and she was talking to us about Knowbility. If you’re new to Knowbility, K-N-O-W-B-I-L-I-T-Y, it’s a organization that teaches folks how to make their websites accessible, and PDF files, and other things. But they’ve been doing
it for a number of years, they teach classes on it,
and in fact, this May, someone we know is teaching
a class on captioning. – We Will be. – The Gene and Dave Show, yeah. So you’ll wanna contact
Knowbility about that to learn how to have
some fun with captions. – Actually, here’s the
web address where you can log in and see what AccessU is all about, and even register for the conference. It’s a great time. If you ever wanna know
anything about accessibility, this is the place to go,
’cause there’s people that come from all over the
place that talk about legal. “Am I legal?” If you’ve got questions like that, or “What do I have to do to become legal?” ’cause the law’s important,
and if you’re a business owner or running a company, even
if it’s a small nonprofit, you wanna make sure
that you’re accessible. Not only with a ramp in the front door, or a door opener, or a bathroom
with a door big enough, but all the digital
aspects that go into it. Make sure your website’s accessible, and as Gene mentioned before,
your PDFs that you produce. Make sure they’re accessible too, so that people can use screen readers and other assistive technology
to be able to read ’em. – And you know, Dave, if
you’re a small business, you want your customers to find you. A lotta people don’t know this, but if your website is
accessible, in other words, if it’s coded correctly so that people with low vision or no vision can use the screen reader to see what’s on the webpage, if the webpage is coded correctly,
it’ll download quicker. So, if you’re in a parking lot somewhere, and you’re trying to find his business or information about a business,
and it’s taking forever to come up on your phone,
you may have lost a customer. But if the webpage is accessible, pulls up quicker, it’s just good business. – Yep. John Slayton always said
accessibility code is good code. – And he was a smart man, too. – Yes, yes. – Oh, you know when we
were talking to Sharron, James Green was there. Now, James Green is with Visa. (cash register dings) He’s also on the board of Knowbility and Visa does accessibility work – They do.
here in Austin, and I managed to suggest to James that you
and I should come over and take a look at their setup. So he’s gonna see if he can arrange that– – Oh, wow, all right! – For us, so– – Look for that in a
future show, us at Visa. Are they giving out cards, too? – (laughs) That’s what I told him. When James applied to
Visa, he didn’t even have a Visa card at the time,
but they hired him anyway. Anyway, some good folks down there, so it’s good running into them. Let’s see, we ran into a gentleman, I don’t wanna even attempt to pronounce his name, he’s from Taiwan, but he had a company called Surglasses. S-U-R-G-L-A-S-S-E-S. – Surglasses. – Dot com, and he was showing me a model
of the brain and the spine, and he was saying, “You know,
if you’ve got a brain tumor, the doctors would rather not cut you open, but if that’s the only way they can see what it is they’ve gotta extract, then that’s what’s gonna happen.” But he developed some glasses
that gives the surgeon a 3D view of what’s goin’ on. – I had those in my comic books
when I was a kid growing up. You know on the back cover? You put on those x-ray vision glasses, and supposably you can see the bones in your hand when you hold your hand up. – (laughs) Yeah, yeah.
– Oh yeah, I’ve seen those before. They’re like $1.99, right? Plus shipping and handling. – Right. These are just slightly more complex. – Ah, okay. – Yeah, he was showing
me, surgeon can just stick a probe into the head, and if it’s a laser or whatever, he’s got to cauterize something, using these glasses, he can see exactly where
the end of that probe is. And I was telling him
I’ve got kidney stones, maybe my doctor could use that. – Yeah, there you go. – So again, technology at South by Southwest to help
people with disabilities. – Surglasses. – Dave, every year, they seem to have a different theme at
Southwest, South by Southwest. They don’t announce it ahead o’ time, but it’s whatever’s in vogue at the time. And one time was 3D printers. This time, I think it’s robotics. – Robotics was heavy. ‘Course virtual reality is– – Oh, yeah, yeah. – Big right now, too,
but definitely robotics. – We ran into a company
called Kuku, K-U-K-U, and they’re wanting to get computers, or robots
to do more personal tasks for people, and hopin’ that people will. Their vision is that some day, everyone’s gonna have a personal computer. Personal, I’m sorry, personal robot. Well, my thought–
– Everybody will have their own R2-D2 following them around. – Yeah. – C-3PO, right? – Well my thought is, why not hook them up to Alexa, you know, Amazon’s Echo? And you can say, “Alexa, make me a sandwich. Crack me a beer.” And these robotic arms would just do that. So, who knows? – Come over and feed it to you, and pour the beer down your throat, and then you can say, “I’m
drunk, but it wasn’t my fault. It was a computer malfunction.” – Yeah, this picture here doesn’t quite do the robotic arms justice, but they’re getting small enough that you could get ’em in your home. – I always joke and always hope that someday there’s gonna be a
robot that can be my attendant. Actually help me get out
of bed, get dressed, and the whole ball of wax, so
that’s the day I’m waiting for. I don’t know if I’ll
see it in my lifetime, but I’m sure it’s comin’. – Yeah, me too. If I wanna stay up late,
whatever, midnight, one o’clock, I could do that, or if
I wanna get up early, five in the morning, could do that. That robot would be there to do that. A year ago I wouldn’t have imagined the progress that was made with Alexa and the Amazon Echo. – And there’s several other
brands that’re out there. – Yeah, Google Home.
– Google, and Apple has their own Home version, too. – This technology is
developing rather quickly. Who knows? We may see a robot in my home next year. – (laughs) There you go. – Then o’ course, in addition to all this high-tech stuff, we find, well, you never know
what you’re gonna find there. – You never know what you’re gonna find at South by Southwest. They’ve got all the
new-age technology, robots, and things like that, but then, we went to a pretty
fascinating presentation on, well, it was disability-related. What was the title of that, Gene? – Oh, that was Sex, Beauty,
and Women with Disabilities. – Yeah, I wonder why we
would go to that one. – (laughs) Well to start with, our old friend Brittany was there. – From ablethrive.com. – We ran into Brittany a couple years ago, and some say she’s stalking us, we might be stalking her, I don’t know. But we look for her– – We always seem to cross paths, and AbleThrive is a great
website for finding out things about disability-related issues. If you have a disability,
or a loved one that’s maybe just recently became disabled
because of a car accident or something else, it’s really a good. The object of the site is to show that people with disabilities
can keep on going, similar to our show, so I think that’s why we always cross paths, and
she’s a really cool person. – Yeah, you know, Dave, we should submit something to that website. They’re looking for snippets that people can send in, like,
say someone’s a paraplegic, how to transfer from
their wheelchair to a car. – Right, kind of instructional
videos on how to deal with, how other people, at least,
deal with their disabilities, and how they still get things done. – Yeah, yeah, a great
website, and let’s make it a point to contribute to them. – All right.
– Some time. – Maybe, let us know what
your favorite thing is that you’ve seen on
the Gene and Dave Show, and we’ll throw that at AbleThrive. – Yeah, yeah, and if
you have questions how Dave and I do stuff, well,
we’ll answer that, too. – Absolutely. – But Brittany was monitoring, or perhaps that’s not the word. – She was kinda the emcee of the group, asking questions and
delving deeper into ’em. She has a lot of different
disability knowledge of a variety of disabilities, so she was able to really pinpoint on the issues and get information out of
the women that were there. – Yeah, there were several women. One was blind. There was another woman in a, I believe she was a quad,
using electric chair. And one woman with a, well,
perhaps it was the same blind woman that a
seeing-eye dog with her. But they give their
different views on dating, or how they’re being treated
by the general public. I don’t know, some of the questions, people would ask them, or tell them, “If you were blind, I would date you,” or something like that.
– Yeah, yeah. In fact, let’s run a few of the highlights from that presentation. – As a YouTuber who has
hundreds of thousands of people watching my videos, I get
a lot of ignorant comments on a daily basis, like “If you’re blind, why do you even bother doing your makeup?” “Why do you like fashion
if you can’t see it?” “Is sex better ’cause you’re blind, since your senses are heightened?” Just these crazy things, and instead of getting frustrated at that,
or frustrated at the comments “You don’t look blind, so
you must be faking it,” instead, I use that as fuel to continue being passionate about educating, and being passionate
about being an open book, and sharing things even if
it’s vulnerable and scary. – Go on. (group laughs) – A couple that I get
almost on a daily basis is “You’re too pretty to be blind.” – Ugh. – Yeah, drives me nuts. Or that “You’re really pretty
considering you’re blind,” like “You’re really attractive given you have this horrible situation that you have,” like this big negative. – You know, Gene, the
common theme that went along with that whole presentation was the things that women with
disabilities have to go through and the things in their lives, and really, it’s not much different than what other women have to go through. With all the sex scandals and things that are on the news right now, people with disabilities
kind of experience the same thing, although
it’s to a different degree. Most of these women that use wheelchairs or have other disabilities
can be more vulnerable to attackers, so to speak. – Yeah, the one statistic
that they mentioned was that 90% of the women that
are sexually assaulted have a disability. – It’s way too many. – Yeah, that’s incredulous. And I can see how that can happen, but things have got to change. When we started our show years ago, I thought it was gonna be just
for people with disabilities, but when we look at
analytics, we’re finding it’s by people in the general population, and I hope you folks
out there listening now just treat us like regular
people for God’s sakes. Can’t we just all get along? – Sure. – That was a good panel. Speaking of sex, at that same panel, a woman volunteered this information and– – Someone from the audience
came up with a question. Well, more of a statement than a question. – Her name’s Deanna, and she said she makes sex toys
for people with disabilities. – Oh, behave. – Very intriguing.
– (laughs) Yeah.
– I was interested, of course, in the interest of research, I had to go to her website to check it out.
– Sure. Had to research her website. Yeah, I get it, Gene. So we went to theitcollection.com, and how would you describe it? It’s mostly just pillows that– – Yeah, it’s a wedge pillow that folds into different positions and
helps you, or helps a person, either get into a different position, or it will hold their sex toy for them, so that you, if you don’t have arms, you don’t have to hold it. – Yeah, and I’ve– – And it works both for men and women. – And I thought this was
pretty clever because we, and it just makes so much sense, that a lotta people, different ages, are no longer the spry, fit 19-year-old they were at one time, and could use a little bit of help with support, physical support. Folks, check it out. theitcollection.com. The website’s really done well. – Yeah, we’d love to show
you some videos here, but (both laugh) this is a family show.
– Family show. Family show, folks. Let’s see. Also, while we were downtown,
we went to our favorite presentation every year, the
Community Service Awards. – Oh, yes. Formerly known as the Dewey Awards. – Yep, the Dewey Awards,
after founding father of South by Southwest, Dewey. The Community Service
Awards are given to people who use technology in their community, to help people in their community. We saw Glenda Simms was there. Here’s a picture of
Glenda giving me a kiss. She can’t resist me.
(Dave laughs) It’s not a very good
picture, but Glenda Simms is a old friend of the show. We’re happy to see her. – Glenda the Good Witch. – Glenda the Good Witch. – Yeah, she is awesome. She’s another person that, if you ever have an accessibility issue,
I recommend contacting her. She knows code backward and forward, and she works for a company called Deque that also helps big corporations ensure that their websites are accessible. – That’s D-E-Q-U-E .com.
– That’s right. They also have some
wonderful testing tools that you can purchase from them and use to test the website on your own. This is real important,
either when you’re developing a new website, or as you have a website that you make changes
to, you wanna make sure that you don’t accidentally lose the accessibility that you’ve created. – Good point, Dave. And whenever you’re designing a webpage, keep accessibility in mind
from the very beginning. – Absolutely, that’s
what (mumbles) for sure. – Don’t make it an afterthought. Keep it in mind from the beginning. It’s a lot easier to do that way. Let’s see, Kathy Keller was at
the Community Service Awards. Just good to see so many folks that are so concerned about the community. We had a good time there,
and that was at the Hilton. While we were at the
Hilton, here’s a picture of me in front of the safe,
had to make a withdrawal from the Gene and Dave account, – All right! – To pay for the on-screen talent we have. – Gee, I never got any of that. – (laughs) You didn’t get it? Lemme check on that. – Okay, please do.
– Lemme check on it. For the Community Service
Awards, there was a gentleman named Char Hu, I’m not sure
if I’m pronouncing that right. He developed something called Helper Bees which is a service that matches attendants with people
who, particularly seniors, that are looking for
some type of attendant. – Yeah, and that’s just
up the road in Georgetown. – Oh, wow, okay. That’s something you
might wanna check out. Helper Bees. And then, of course, you spent some time on Sixth Street, was it? You got some good shots of,
well here’s one of Antone’s. – Yeah, it’s just
craziness on Sixth Street, and I just love taking
my camera down there and bringin’ it to you on the screen of some wacky
times on Sixth Street. Here’s some ladies enjoying a little dance at a bar, and as I was filming them, the guitar player jumped
up in the window, and had to capture that,
too, so here’s that clip. (slow bluesy music) – And you’ve got a good shot from inside a hotel peering
down onto the streets. I don’t know how you
find these places, but somehow you get some great shots. – Yeah, so you can see the hustle bustle around Sixth Street,
around South by Southwest. This was kinda one of the first few days, so it was a little slower than usual, and it wasn’t dark yet, which is when everybody seems to come
out onto Sixth Street, but still you can see plenty of activity. – Speaking of activity, back
in the convention center, you mentioned before the virtual reality and such,
here’s a animation video of someone, someone was wearing some type of identifiers on his arms and legs, and those were matched up to a
figure, a different figure, animated figure, so when
he, say, jumped up and down, the animated figure
would jump up and down. – Hi. As you can see, I’m controlling
that guy with my body. Whatever I do, he will do it, too, and when I speak, he speaks with my voice. Bye. Hey, come over. – Okay, what? Do you know why bicycles fall over? – Why? – Because they are too tired. – The world of animation has
just come so far with that. It was great to see. Here’s a video of me with
a big heart in front of me, and here’s another one showing proof that the world does
revolve around me. (laughs) Used for entertainment and games, it’s just come a long ways. And if you get tired of the animations, (chuckles) there’s plenty
to drink around there. Fact, it’s easier to find beer, and wine, and Deep Eddy Vodka than it is water at South by Southwest. I met this gentleman
from Ireland there, and they don’t have little tables where you could set a glass down, so I told him I wanted to get a
sample o’ Guinness, and I said, “Can you pull a straw out for me, here?” I always pack straws with me. Put it in there, and I
said, “I won’t be long, I’ll just chug the whole thing,” and– – So he held it for you, while you put your straw in there
– He held it for me while I sucked it down, and
they couldn’t believe it, and I thought, “Oh, this is
a great photo opportunity.” So I said, “Oh, lemme try it
again, but lemme get a photo.” So he pulled out another beer and (laughs) I had to do that one, and– – Well sometimes, you just
gotta do what you gotta do for the good of the show. – Exactly. – Might be drinking two or three beers. – So they made me an official Irishman. – Oh, okay, so now you’re Irish. – Yeah. That was great. Now you ran into a company, XD? – Yeah, I saw this guy with this huge backpack on his back, and I was like, “Wow, what is this
thing?” and I immediately thought of like a jet pack
that James Bond would wear, but it was a pack that
was on his back, and you can see it here, and as you go up, you see all these little fans
around him, and actually, it’ll lift you. You can’t fly with it, but the prototypes that they were making, you can jump up and down, and I thought, “What a great device for
somebody that has a disability,” who maybe they can move their legs, but they can’t stand up unless,
if they put this backpack on, then the fans could lift them
up into a standing position. I thought, “Well, this is
just a harebrained idea that I would have because
I have a disability that could benefit from
something like that.” So being part of the Gene and Dave Show, I went and asked him. And sure enough, that’s one
of the design principles behind it; one of the
reasons that they’re doing it is to help people with disabilities. – Wow, okay. Lotsa times we’ll go,
we’ll talk to the vendors. Sometimes they have products made specifically for people with disabilities. Sometimes they just have products– – That are made for lazy people. (both laugh)
– Yes. And we might say, “You know, if someone with
a disability had this, it could really make their life easier–
– Right. Couple years ago, we found
the headphones that were – Oh, yeah.
– really easy to work with your hand, you didn’t
have to use a finger into a small button, it was like the whole side of the headphone. – So it’s great that we were able to have these conversations with folks. See what they’re thinking,
and to make companies aware that we are a force in the
community, and we have needs. – We’re out there. People with disabilities are out there. – (chuckles) In your neighborhood. (Dave laughs) The one sad thing is, Dave, that there were so many good presentations specifically about
people with disabilities or for people with disabilities that were held at the same
time, and we couldn’t go. Couldn’t be in two places.
– You can’t be in two places at once, or three places, or four places. – Or they started early
in the morning, and we just couldn’t get to ’em, so we missed a number of ’em, but if you’ve got a program, a business, that can benefit folks with disabilities, we would love to hear about it, and we might even have
you on the show, here. – Yeah, that’d be great. The more, the merrier,
and the more information that we can get out to folks,
that’s what we’re here for. That’s what the show is all about. We thank you for tuning in,
and as always, check out thegeneanddaveshow.com to
find more videos, outtakes, and news stories about people with disabilities. So long folks. Adios. [music]

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