Veins of the body – PART 2 – Anatomy Tutorial

Veins of the body – PART 2 – Anatomy Tutorial


…arterial supply, but I hope it was clear,
the difference between the superficial and deep system. Just moving back centrally to
the heart, I’m now going to work my way downwards to look at the blood supply from the venous
drainage from the lower limbs. So I’ve shown you the superior vena cava and
the inferior vena cava leading into the right atrium. So I’ve removed a lot of vessels here.
There are a lot of branches on the inferior vena cava, which I’ve removed and we’ll talk
about in future tutorials on the digestive system and the blood supply and drainage of
those various organs. So just down here, we’re now at the level
of the L5 lumbar vertebra. This is where the inferior vena cava bifurcates into its branches.
So you’ve got the common iliac veins. You’ve got the right and left common iliac veins. So these split into two. You’ve got the external
and the internal iliac veins. The external and the internal iliac veins join to form
the common iliac vein. That converges with its counterpart with the inferior vena cava.
So you’ve got the common iliac vein which splits into the external and internal iliac
vein. So just before I go any further, I just need
to point out another important vein. You can see running on the anterior surface of these
vertebral bodies, you’ve got a vein running up and draining into the superior vena cava.
You can see it running up the anterior surface of the vertebral bodies and then draining
into the superior vena cava here. So this is the azygos vein. The azygos venous
system drains blood from the posterior walls of the abdomen, of the thorax and abdomen
and it drains into the superior vena cava. This is the azygos vein. That runs on the
right side. And you’ve got the accessory and hemiazygos veins, which run up the left side
of the vertebra. So that’s the azygos system, which runs on the anterior surface of the
vertebral bodies and drains into the superior vena cava. So you’ve got the azygos vein on
the right size and you’ve got the hemiazygos and accessory azygos veins running up the
left side. So just moving back to where we were, we’ve
got the common iliac veins, which are formed from the external and internal iliac veins
merging. Working our way down, the external iliacs are formed from the femoral vein and
this long vein which runs down the entire length of the leg on the medial aspect. This
is called the long saphenous vein. It runs all the way down the medial aspect of the
leg to join the dorsal venous plexus of the foot. So just going back up again, you’ve got the
external iliac being formed from the femoral vein and the long saphenous vein. So the long saphenous vein is a superficial
vein. The femoral vein is a deep vein. If I just put in the muscle layer, you can see
this. You can see the femoral vein. It just runs deep into the muscle layer and then the
long saphenous vein runs superficially all the way down the inner leg. So it’s medial.
It runs medially all the way down to the foot where it joins the dorsal venous arch of the
foot. So that’s the long saphenous vein. So the long saphenous vein and the femoral vein
join into the external iliac vein. Just working our way down to the back of the
knee now, we’re now in the popliteal fossa region. That’s the back of the knee is called
the popliteal fossa. The vessels at the back of the knee are popliteal vessels. So you’ve
got a popliteal artery here and you’ve got the popliteal vein here, which joins into
the femoral vein. So this is the popliteal vein and you can see the long saphenous vein
here running all the way down the medial side. So the popliteal vein has a branch, the anterior
tibial vein, which goes here down the anterior aspect of the aspect (just like the anterior
tibial artery). And then you’ve got these two veins. You’ve got the peroneal vein, which
is also known as the fibular vein because it runs on the fibula side, so the peroneal
muscle group or the lateral muscle group of the lower leg. This vein which comes off the
popliteal vein is the peroneal vein and this runs on the lateral side. So it’s also known
as the fibular vein, so it runs on the side of the fibula, which is lateral. And you’ve also got the posterior tibial,
the counterpart to the anterior tibial vein. This runs down the posterior aspect of the
tibia. And then you’ve got another superficial vein.
This is the short saphenous vein. Remember the long saphenous vein which runs all the
way up the medial aspect of the leg, the short saphenous vein runs centrally down the back
of the leg and it’s superficial. It’s quite hard to understand, to see and
judge the depth. The deep veins are these posterior tibial veins and the peroneal veins
and the superficial veins are the saphenous veins, the long saphenous which runs all the
way down the medial aspect and the short saphenous which comes off the popliteal vein here. The
short saphenous vein runs down the back of the calf muscle and then it winds around laterally
and joins to form the dorsal venous arch of the foot, this arch here. So remember the long saphenous vein which
runs down the medial side join to form the venous arch, the other side of the venous
arch is formed by the short saphenous vein, which runs down the middle of the calf and
then winds around laterally. So in the lower leg, you’ve got superficial
and deep veins. A deep vein thrombosis occurs in the deep veins of the legs. A deep vein
thrombosis can occur all the way up into the femoral vein, which is also a deep vein — so
this vein, this thick vein here. An important thing to be aware of isn’t actually
shown in these models is that you have veins which connects the deep and superficial veins,
perforator veins which contain the deep to the superficial veins. Blood flows from superficial
to deep. So if valves become incompetent in the veins of the leg, blood may then accumulate
in the superficial veins, so in the long and short saphenous veins, which then become swollen
and torturous and you get varicose veins. So that’s what varicose veins are. Those are the important veins of the body
that you should be aware of.

45 thoughts on “Veins of the body – PART 2 – Anatomy Tutorial”

  1. @sbalmiki1166 Thanks, glad it was helpful! I actually haven't got round to making the tutorials on the blood supply to the digestive system, but I will try and get them up before the end of next week.

  2. absolutely great video! really helped with my assignment, maybe next time you can put labels of the veins or arteries on ur videos as some of the spellings are complex… save me looking in a textbook…

    keep up the good work

  3. I don't know how…but you actually make anatomy INTERESTING. I hated anatomy in books… but your videos are just amazing!
    I can't thank you enough!

  4. I am unable to find a video that describes all the veins..including azygous system,gonadal,lumbar ,renal veins..and all the other veins of the body…None of the videos has a complete description 🙁

  5. hmm, you seem to mention that the tibial posterior and peroneal/fibular vein drain into the popliteal, to be more specific however, the peroneal/ fibular vein drains into the tibial posterior vein which in turn  then drains into the popliteal vein (they both do not simultaneously drain into it). 
    Thank you for the great video! It was very helpful!

  6. Thank you! I neglected to study veins for my test tomorrow. I got all caught up in arteries, but this video really helped. I have an hour to kill before the test tomorrow. I think ill watch it again

  7. I never understood the arterial/venous/ lymphatic drainage properly in first year as even in books like gray's, they don't describe the arterial system or venous course throughout the body. Everything given in bits and pieces really din't help in connecting the dots.You really helped by giving a big picture and all your videos are very helpful. Thank you sir.

  8. Actually I've been suffering from vein pain problems of legs since two years so if you can give some suggestions plz give me best suggestions to solve that problems.

  9. hey ,if anyone else needs to find out about human anatomical try Laophiaa Cranial Blueprint (search on google ) ? Ive heard some extraordinary things about it and my brother in law got cool success with it.

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